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Posts Tagged “senior safety”

Keeping Seniors Safe at Home During the Pandemic: Grocery Shopping Tips

Keeping Seniors Safe at Home

It’s best for older adults who are more vulnerable to avoid high-traffic areas such as grocery stores.

Experts say that people should avoid crowded places because of COVID-19, and the CDC is asking that elders with underlying health conditions stay home entirely. This can make it a challenge when seniors are in need of groceries. To help, we’ve provided details on several helpful solutions; and know that Nightingale caregivers are always available to assist our clients in getting necessary items.

The following grocery and meal-delivery services are available to assist anyone in getting their groceries by ordering online, including:

If Your Groceries Are Delivered

Even if a grocery store or warehouse is thoroughly cleaned on a regular basis, the delivery person needs to take the same precautions to prevent the spread of a virus to you. While these companies might recommend that deliverers wash their hands often, practice other hygiene measures, and stay home when they’re feeling sick, they can’t monitor whether drivers are actually taking those precautions. So, follow these steps when ordering deliveries:

  • Avoid a direct hand-off.Arrange to have the items delivered to your doorstep instead of handing them off inside your home.
  • Tip electronically.One benefit of ordering deliveries online or via an app is that you don’t have to hand the delivery person money. Opportunities to tip the delivery person are included in most of the delivery apps and online ordering systems.
  • Wash your hands and countertops. Follow the instructions below for unpacking and preparing your food.
  • Order earlier than you usually do.Though it’s not a direct health or safety issue, you may find that you have to wait longer for the items you need, so plan in advance for those items.

Picking up Pre-Packaged Groceries

The steps are basically the same for this option as for delivery. If you’ve ordered your groceries and go to pick them up and are having someone put the groceries in your car in a parking lot, consider opening your car door or trunk yourself rather than having the person touch the door handle. If you can pay and tip on a supermarket’s app, do that rather than handing over cash or a credit card. Be sure to wear a mask if you step outside your car or come within six feet of the delivery person. Use your hand sanitizer if you are touching any surfaces and wash your hands immediately upon returning home.

Buying Groceries in the Store

Only shop if you absolutely need to, and never go out if you are feeling sick. If you must go out to get groceries, keep yourself safe and follow these tips:

  • Wear a mask. Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face covering while you are out. Avoid touching your mask and make sure you sanitize your hands immediately after removing it.
  • Avoid touching your face. Don’t touch your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Practice social distancing. Stay at least 6 feet away from all other people at all times. Most stores have outlined these distances in check-out lines. If someone coughs or sneezes, do not walk through the area where they coughed or sneezed. Remember while you are shopping down the aisles, always keep your distance.
  • Go shopping at a time that’s less busy.If you look online and type in the store’s name and location in a  Google search, a box will pop up showing when foot traffic there is highest. Many stores now offer times when only elders can enter the store, avoiding younger people who may unknowingly carry the virus. You must still keep your distance from others while shopping, staying at least 6 feet away at all times.
  • Disinfect your shopping cart. Most grocery stores have disinfectant wipes available, or have procedures to disinfect the carts before and after use. Shop only at stores that observe these precautions.
  • Take germicide and hand sanitizer with you.Be prepared to use your own disinfectant if the carts are not routinely disinfected. Use hand sanitizer after paying and after leaving the store. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when you return home.
  • Reusable bags.If you use reusable grocery bags, it is recommended to leave them in your car or the garage for at least a week, or wipe them down thoroughly with a germicide before re-use.
  • Use a credit or debit card. Avoid handing over bills or receiving change into your hand. Also, use your own pen to sign receipts. If you can, use a virtual payment system like Apple Pay so that you don’t have to open your wallet at all.

Unpacking and Preparing Your Food

Once you have your groceries inside your home, you must take precautions when putting them away and preparing them. Contact with food packaging and food isn’t thought to spread the virus, so there is no need to carry out any special disinfecting procedures on the food or packaging, but following these steps is important:

  • Drop your groceries at the door. Once you arrive home, drop your groceries at the door and go directly to wash your hands. Then, move them to your counter to unpack them. After unpacking, wash your hands again.
  • Wash your produce. Don’t use disinfectants on food, as this can pose other health risks. Instead, rub your fruit and vegetables under clear, running water, and scrub those with hard skin. This can help remove not only pesticides, but also potential viruses.
  • Wash counters, and other surfaces you’ve touched. Use a disinfectant wipe or spray to clean all surfaces.
  • Eating your food. Currently, there is no data to show that COVID-19 is spread by consuming food, so the risk of getting the virus from your food is considered low.

The ideal way to keep seniors safe at home, however, is by partnering with Nightingale Homecare. As the top providers of Phoenix care at home, our professional caregivers are trained and experienced in safety procedures to reduce the risk to seniors of contracting COVID-19 or other viruses. Let us take care of running errands such as grocery shopping for a senior you love! Contact us any time at (602) 504-1555 to learn more about our trusted home care services in Phoenix and the surrounding areas .

Debunking Common Senior Psychotherapy Misconceptions

Senior Psychotherapy

It’s important to learn the facts behind these senior psychotherapy myths.

Change can be hard for all of us, but consider for a moment the depth of change experienced in aging. The elderly encounter changes in health, in self-identity, in their roles and responsibilities and relationships with others. Loss of friends and loved ones becomes more common, along with loss of physical ability and sometimes mental acuity.

One of the best ways to adapt to change is through counseling; yet sadly, senior psychotherapy is disproportionately underutilized. In fact, as few as 3% of licensed psychotherapists have received specialized training in geriatric counseling. There are three main myths surrounding counseling for the elderly that our Phoenix home health agency wants to debunk in order to help more families consider seeking psychological care for the seniors they love:

Myth #1: The elderly are too “set in their ways” to benefit from counseling.

Some of the many beautiful qualities that develop as we age include increased wisdom, maturity, character, and authenticity. While some older adults may exhibit some measure of stubbornness, it’s often a defense mechanism, indicating an underlying issue that should be addressed. A professional counselor can help the senior gently peel away the layers of pain and loss to uncover the root of the problem and provide effective coping skills.

Myth #2: Because the elderly are nearing the end of life, senior psychotherapy isn’t worth the time invested.

The truth is, none of us know how many days we have left to live – and yet we all should have the opportunity to live each of those days to the fullest. Every older adult has a rich history, a story to tell, and struggles that have either been overcome or are continuing to hinder their ability to experience the inner peace and joy they deserve; and senior psychotherapy is a great way to help the elderly come to an acceptance of their past and to set and achieve future goals.

Myth #3: The difficulties experienced by some older adults are insurmountable – and counseling won’t help.

Even with debilitating, chronic conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, a trusted, professional psychotherapist can meet the senior in his or her own reality, providing comfort, reduced feelings of isolation, and ability-appropriate mechanisms to achieve a higher quality of life.

At Nightingale Homecare, we believe in a holistic, whole-person approach to care that addresses both the physical and emotional needs of seniors. Our experienced Phoenix respite care team is on hand to help families find the resources they need, including senior psychotherapy care, in addition to our full range of in-home services such as:

  • Skilled nursing care:
    • Wound care
    • Blood draws
    • IV services
    • Tube feedings
    • And more
  • Personal care:
    • Companionship
    • Meal planning and preparation
    • Light housekeeping
    • Medication reminders
    • And more
  • In-home therapy:
    • Speech therapy
    • Occupational therapy
    • Physical therapy
    • Nutrition counseling
    • And more
  • Highly specialized dementia care
  • And many others

Contact us any time at (602) 504-1555 and let us help a senior you love enjoy a better life each day, right in the comfort of home.

Posted in Aging Issues, Senior Health on October 9th, 2019 · Comments Off on Debunking Common Senior Psychotherapy Misconceptions

The In Home Care Paradise Valley Pros Share Tips for Taking Vital Signs

Scottsdale Senior Home Care - checking vital signs

Learn everything you need to know about taking vital signs at home from Nightingale Homecare.

If you are a caregiver for a loved one who has a medical condition that requires monitoring, chances are his or her physician has asked you to keep an eye on a measurement or two in order to detect a change in condition. Learning to monitor vital signs is a necessity for caregivers of people with chronic conditions.

Checking vital signs is an important skill to learn, because it tells us how the person’s body is functioning, helping us to monitor current conditions and alerting us to changes in health status. It can also give us clues to possible medical conditions that have yet to be diagnosed. The four main vital signs that are measured to give us an overview of your loved one’s health status are:

  • Body temperature
  • Heart rate (pulse)
  • Respiration rate
  • Blood pressure

Our team of experts in home care Paradise Valley, AZ at Nightingale Homecare shares the following instructions on how to correctly monitor vital signs:

Body Temperature

No individual has the exact same temperature reading throughout the day, as body temperature naturally fluctuates. Normal body temperature measured orally ranges from 97.6 to 99.6 degrees Fahrenheit (36.4 to 37.5 degrees Celsius) for a healthy adult. Of course, normal temperature variation depends on recent activity, food and fluid intake, time of day, etc.

Body temperature may be abnormal due to fever (high temperature) or hypothermia (low temperature). According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, a fever is indicated when body temperature rises one degree or more over the normal temperature of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Hypothermia is defined as a drop in body temperature below 95 degrees Fahrenheit.

There are four different ways to measure body temperature:

Orally: At Nightingale, we ask that our caregivers and clinicians use a digital thermometer to measure oral temperature over glass thermometers due to safety reasons. If you do not have this piece of equipment to monitor your loved one’s temperature, you should make the investment; they are inexpensive and reliable.

Rectally: If your loved one’s doctor asks you to take a rectal temperature, you should use a digital thermometer over a glass thermometer for safety reasons. Rectal temperatures tend to be 0.5 to 0.7 degrees F higher than when taken by mouth.

Axillary: Temperatures can be taken under the arm using a digital thermometer. Temperatures taken by this route tend to be 0.3 to 0.4 degrees F lower than those temperatures taken by mouth.

By ear: A special thermometer can quickly measure the temperature of the ear drum, which reflects the body’s core temperature (the temperature of the internal organs). An ear temperature is between 0.5 -1.0 degrees F higher than an oral temperature.

By skin: A special thermometer can quickly measure the temperature of the skin on the forehead. A skin temperature is between 0.5 -1.0 degrees F lower than an oral temperature.

Taking Body Temperature Using a Digital Thermometer:

  • Wash your hands.
  • Cover thermometer mouth tip with a clean plastic shield.
  • Press button to set the thermometer.
  • Place the thermometer under the tongue and instruct your loved one to close his or her lips around the probe.
  • Wait several minutes and remove thermometer when beeping indicates the reading is complete.
  • If you are taking a record for your loved one’s physician, write down the temperature, including the date, time and method used as follows: “O” for oral, “R” for rectal, “E” for ear, “A” for axillary.
  • Remove the plastic shield.
  • Clean and sterilize the thermometer following manufacturer’s instructions, or with an alcohol prep pad wiping from the top to the tip.

Note: Oral thermometers are not indicated for some individuals, such as those with a history of seizures, or people unable to close their mouth fully. Digital thermometers can be used to take an axillary temperature by being placed under the armpit, against dry skin, and following the instructions noted above.

Pulse Rate 

Pulse rate, also called heart rate, indicates the number of times the heart beats per minute. As the heart pushes blood through the arteries, the arteries expand and contract with the flow of the blood. Taking a pulse not only measures the heart rate, but also can give us information on the strength and rhythm of the heart.

Normal pulse for healthy adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats per minute. The pulse rate may fluctuate and increase with exercise, illness, room temperature, injury, and emotions. It is not uncommon for athletes, who do a lot of cardiovascular conditioning, to have a heart rate of nearly 40 beats per minute and experience no problems.

Taking a Pulse Rate:

  • Wash your hands.
  • Make sure that your loved one is at rest before you begin.
  • The easiest place to find a pulse to measure is at the radial artery found on the inside of the wrist at the base of the thumb. Alternatively, you can find the pulse on the inside of the elbow (brachial artery), or neck (carotid artery).
  • Note: If you use the neck, be sure not to press too hard, and never press on the pulses on both sides of the lower neck at the same time to prevent blocking blood flow to the brain.
  • Use your first and second fingertips (never the thumb, because it has a pulse and will interfere with an accurate assessment of your loved one’s heart rate) to press firmly but gently on the wrist (or otherwise) until you feel a pulse
  • With an analog clock or watch, wait until the second hand is on the 12 to begin counting.
  • Begin counting the beats of the pulse
  • Count pulse for 60 seconds until the second hand returns to the 12. Or, you may also count for 15 seconds and multiply by 4 to calculate beats per minute. Note: The physician may request for you to take the loved one’s heart rate for a full minute, if he/she has an irregular heart rate.
  • When counting, do not watch the clock continuously, but concentrate on the beats of the pulse.
  • If your loved one’s physician asks for a record, write down the heart rate, including the date, time, and if you notice any irregularities.

Respiratory Rate

Respiration rate, also referred to as breathing rate, is the number of breaths taken over a minute. This measurement is always taken when the person is at rest and involves how many times the chest rises per minute.  One respiration count is equal to the chest rising (inhaling) and falling (exhaling) once. The normal range for an adult is 12 to 20 respirations per minute.  Factors like age, fever, agitation, activity, illness and sleeping can alter breathing and therefore the respiratory rate.  When a person is acutely ill, respiratory rate fluctuations and patterns are monitored as a warning sign for further decline.  

Taking Respiratory Rate:

  • You can keep your fingers on the radial pulse after you have stopped counting pulse rate, and use the next minute to count the person’s respiratory rate.
  • With an analog clock or watch, wait until the second hand is on the 12 to begin counting.
  • Count breaths (inhale + exhale = 1 respiration) for one minute. You may also count for 15 seconds and multiply by 4 to calculate breaths per minute.
  • If your loved one’s doctor wants a record, write down respiration rate, noting any observations (such as irregularity, increased effort or wheezing). 

Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the artery walls during contraction and relaxation of the heart. Each time the heart beats, it pushes blood into the arteries, resulting in the highest (top) number of pressure reading. This is called “systolic.” The bottom number, lowest reading or “diastolic” is when the heart is totally relaxed before the next beat. The blood pressure measurement is recorded in millimeters of mercury or mm Hg and written as systolic/diastolic.

A blood pressure reading identifies how effectively the oxygenating blood is moving through the blood vessels of the circulatory system. In healthy adults, the systolic pressure should be less than 130 and the diastolic pressure should be less than 85. High pressure is called hypertension and low pressure is called hypotension.   Many health conditions can affect blood pressure. Cardiac patients, and those afflicted with hypertension, are instructed to monitor their blood pressure, as it can directly lead to life-altering conditions like heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

At Nightingale, all of our staff use manual or android cuffs, as electronic blood pressure machines can be unreliable and false readings could lead to devastating consequences for your loved one. You will need to have a stethoscopeblood pressure cuff with inflatable balloon (sphygmomanometer) with a numbered pressure gauge called a digital monitor or aneroid monitor.

Before you measure your loved one’s blood pressure:

The American Heart Association recommends the following guidelines for home blood pressure monitoring:

  • Have your loved one refrain from smoking or drinking coffee for 30 minutes before taking blood pressure.
  • Have your loved one go to the bathroom before the test.
  • Your loved one should relax for 5 minutes before taking the measurement.

Taking Blood Pressure 

  • Have your loved one sit with the back supported (he or she shouldn’t sit on a couch or soft chair). Your loved one’s feet should be on the floor and uncrossed.
  • Wash your hands.
  • Place your loved one’s arm on a solid flat surface (like a table) with the upper part of the arm at heart level.
  • Place fingers on the underside of the elbow to locate the pulse (called the brachial pulse).
  • Wrap and fasten the deflated cuff snugly around the upper arm at least one inch above where you felt the strong and steady brachial pulse.
  • Position the stethoscope diaphragm directly over the brachial pulse and insert the earpieces.
  • Turn the knob on the air pump clockwise to close the valve.
  • Pump air, inflating the arm cuff until the dial pointer reaches 170.
  • Gently turn the knob on the air pump counter-clockwise to open the valve and deflate the cuff.
  • As the dial pointer falls, watch the number and listen for a thumping sound.
  • Note the number shown where the first thump is heard (systolic pressure).
  • Note the number shown where the last thump is heard (diastolic pressure).
  • Deflate and remove cuff.
  • If your loved one’s doctor asked you to take multiple readings during one sitting, take the readings one minute apart and record all the results.
  • It is best to take blood pressure at the same time every day.
  • If your loved one’s doctor asks for a record, write down the date, time, and blood pressure reading.
  • When blood pressure reaches a systolic (top number) of 180 or higher OR diastolic (bottom number) of 110 or higher, this could require emergency medical treatment, so call your loved one’s doctor for further instruction. 

Properly monitoring vital signs can be a challenge, which is why we recommend letting Nightingale Homecare’s professional home health care staff take care of it for you! Our team of experts in home care Paradise Valley, AZ is highly skilled in a wide range of both medical and non-medical home care services, ensuring that older adults live their safest and healthiest lives possible, in the comfort and familiarity of home. Contact us at (602) 504-1555 to learn more and to find out if our services are available in your area.

The Changing Face of Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson's Disease - respite care sun city az

Discover the 5 stages of Parkinson’s disease and the changes that may occur in each from the Phoenix senior care team at Nightingale Homecare.

According to the Parkinson’s Foundation, the number of Americans diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease is predicted to cross the one million mark by next year – impacting more than those with MS, muscular dystrophy, and Lou Gehrig’s disease combined. In fact, there are already more than ten million people with the disease worldwide.

As such, it’s likely that most of us either already are or will be closely acquainted with someone managing the disease; so it’s important for all of us to better understand how the disease progresses, and what changes might be encountered in each stage. Our Phoenix senior care team has the information you need:

Stage 1

In the beginning stage of Parkinson’s disease, patients typically begin to experience mild tremors on one side of the body, as well as barely perceptible changes to posture, ambulation, and/or facial expressions.

Stage 2

As the disease begins to progress to Stage 2, tremors may become apparent on both sides of the body, along with rigidity and more noticeable changes to posture and ambulation. During this phase, patients can usually still manage daily life independently, although with a bit more difficulty.

Stage 3

Balance and coordination issues are common in this stage, leading to slowed movements and increased risk of falls. Activities of daily living (ADLs) such as getting dressed and eating may require a little assistance – or may simply take more time to complete independently.

Stage 4 

In the fourth stage of the disease, there is a markedly greater level of impairment, and many daily tasks will require assistance, including help with walking and other forms of movement.

Stage 5

In the fifth and final stage of Parkinson’s disease, many patients will need a wheelchair for mobility, as impairment of motor skills advances and there is increased difficulty with standing, walking, and managing daily activities. Hallucinations are also common in this stage.

If you or a senior loved one is managing the effects of Parkinson’s disease, our Phoenix senior care team is on hand to help with personalized services adapted to meet needs both now and as the disease progresses in the future.

Our Journeys Parkinson’s and Movement Disorder program is staffed by BIG and LOUD certified therapists with specialized expertise in improving quality of life for those challenged by movement difficulties such as those experienced in Parkinson’s disease.

  • Our BIG program utilizes a proven exercise approach in which patients learn techniques to make bigger movements that lead to more normalized movement patterns; and
  • Our LOUD program helps patients improve quality and volume of speech, leading to more confident and effective conversation abilities and socialization.

We also work with Parkinson’s patients to improve swallowing, facial muscle control, balance, fine motor skills, fall prevention, and much more.

Contact Nightingale Homecare, the best providers of respite care Sun City, AZ and the surrounding areas depend on for quality care, any time at (602) 504-1555 to learn more about our specialty Parkinson’s care program, or any of our other in-home senior care services.

What Can OT Do for Diabetes? Home Health Experts Have the Answer!

caregiver helping senior client with occupational therapy

Occupational therapy can a great addition to the care team when managing diabetes.

Those with diabetes, and those who provide care for them, know the importance of proper management of the disease: routine monitoring of blood glucose levels, carefully adhering to dietary restrictions, exercising and maintaining regular checkups with the doctor. But what might come as a surprise is the role occupational therapy can play in diabetes management.

Occupational therapists can – and should – be a vital part of a diabetic’s care team, bringing a full range of knowledge and expertise in addressing all of a patient’s needs: emotional, social, sensory and cognitive, as well as physical.

The American Association of Diabetes Educators has compiled the AADE 7TM Self-Care Behaviors, all of which can be enhanced through occupational therapy services:

  1. Healthy eating
  2. Remaining active
  3. Monitoring the disease
  4. Taking medications
  5. Solving problems
  6. Healthy coping skills
  7. Reducing risks

Here are just a few of the many ways a professional occupational therapist can improve diabetes management as well as the overall health and wellbeing for the person diagnosed:

  • Provide recommendations for safe, appropriate physical activity
  • Educate on appropriate meal choices and cooking techniques
  • Assist with medication tracking and organization
  • Share tips for effective blood glucose monitoring
  • Utilize strategies and compensations for those with sensory loss
  • Help alleviate anxiety and depression through daily lifestyle changes
  • Recommend assistive devices as needed
  • And much more

Nightingale Homecare is the perfect care partner for those with diabetes, or any other chronic condition. Our Pathlink Chronic Disease Management Program empowers patients with the education, strategies, technology, and self-management skills to better manage complex care needs. Additionally, our full range of customized home health services can also include occupational therapy and many other care professionals such as physical therapists, speech therapists, nurses, and caregivers, right in the comfort of home.

Whether the need is simply for a little extra help with housework, meals, and personal care, or if a chronic disease calls for skilled medical care, Nightingale Homecare is on hand with the right level of care at the right time. Contact us at (602) 504-1555 for a free in-home consultation where we’ll listen to the challenges being faced and create a plan of care to address those needs, monitoring over time as needs change. Discover how our home health in Phoenix and the surrounding areas can improve quality of life and make each day the very best it can be!